Posts Tagged ‘reviews’

flawed

Cecelia Ahern’s Flawed reminds me of many of the other young adult novels I’ve read as of late. We have our female protagonist, Celestine, who has a perfect life with perfect grades and a perfect boyfriend and a seemingly perfect family. The people in society are branded with an F for “flawed” if they do something wrong or make a poor decision; these people are not allowed to lives the same lives as the non-flawed and are forced to exist under a completely different set of rules. In true young adult dystopian form, Celestine recognizes the insanity of this society, stands up against it, and gets punished for that rebellion. This punishment leads her to a situation where she is forced to choose between two suitors in her life—the typical good boy and bad boy scenario. There is a definite formula to this first book of the series, and it is followed to the letter. You might be thinking now, “Okay, so then why do I want to read this?” Answer? There’s just something about this book.

Ahren’s prose is spot on. The writing is smooth and engrossing, and I never found myself annoyed or lost. The pacing is perfectly laid out and kept me flipping the pages; Flawed never dragged, and I didn’t want to put it down. World building is worked into the story in a way that is shown and not told. I’m really a fan of this sort of build, as a lot of times society setup can turn into one giant info dump. The characters are well constructed as well, albeit slightly predictable. Most characters get a narrative arc of some sort and display growth over the course of the story. Celestine goes from rule follower to logical savior. Her sister Juniper goes from being sassy and not totally authentic in her actions to being very real and gaining a more solid backbone. Even Colleen, a side character, gets a nice little growth arc where she learns about expressing anger.

I found myself wanting to know more about Carrick, as he was intriguing but relegated to a back burner position for most of the novel. I assume his character will play a strong role in the sequel—at least I hope so!!! The only character in this I really didn’t care for was Celestine’s boyfriend, Art. He doesn’t really grow or change at all over the course of the narrative, remaining very fixed and rigid despite many opportunities to grow and change with those surrounding him.

The assessment of this as being a Divergent and Scarlett Letter hybrid is pretty accurate. While nothing unique, Ahren’s prose makes this worth a grab.

Four stars.

**I received Flawed by Cecelia Ahern as an ARC from Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review. Flawed is expected for publication on April 5th, 2016 by Feiwel and Friends.